Things I Have Learned from Weaving

You might remember that I have been relearning how to weave on my four-shaft loom–what I have learned, though, had more to do with me than the loom.

  1. Weaving makes you realize you aren’t the multi-tasker you thought you were. Turns out, I need complete silence to keep track of the pattern. Yeesh! This is when I realized how loud our house was (when did we get so many pets? And why are there birds inside it?)
  2. Weaving teaches you humility. Exactly how many times have I taken this weaving back?
  3. Weaving teaches you patience. See #2.
  4. Weaving teaches you about making good colour choices. Sure, blue and green reminds you of sea glass, but seeing the pattern as you weave is another thing entirely.
  5. Weaving is for pet-free homes.    
  6. Weaving takes a looong time. Don’t give up the day job just yet.
  7. Weaving is good for the soul, when all is said and done. 

A Windy Day’s Works-in-Progress

Sure is windy out there. I mean, REALLY windy. I’m glad to be inside on a mid-week vacation day, sleeping, Ravelry-surfing, favouriting pics in Instagram. Everything but knitting and weaving.

I do have a few works in progress. I finished the teal was-going-to-be-a-neckwarmer-but-turned-into-a-headband a while back. It’s made from one of my favourite alpaca and wool blends. I bought some beautiful pottery buttons from Nancy Blokland Pottery to finish it off. I’m leaning towards the birds-on-a-wire button. The other one is a polar bear (we’re from Manitoba, home of the polar bears), but the design is a little hard to see in this photo. What do you think?

  

Yep, the more I look at it, the bird button is the one.  Now I can’t get the Bird on a Wire song by Jennifer Warnes out of my head.

I also finished off the Ndebele Hat (Lisa McFetridge) in dramatic black and white superwash wool. I love the pattern and plan to knit it again in other colours. This one will fit a child under 10.

cool, eh?

Next up on the needles is a neckwarmer in a beautiful lofty and lustrous aran wool from West Yorkshire Spinners. It’s an imported British natural ecru wool from Bluefaced Leicester sheep. Yummy. My nana was from Yorkshire so of course I had to buy the wool–it would have been wrong not to.

I am knitting it up in the Cable Neck Gaiter pattern from Christine Vawker. Sadly her blog disappeared right after I copied down the pattern so I hope I have it right.  It’s a delicate cabled pattern with shifting cables. I quite like the effect.

   

   

and from the cat gallery…

  

Here is youngest cat on the hairy cat chair watching me take photos on the Trusty Trunk. If it weren’t so blasted windy, I would have ventured outside into the natural sunlight, but that’s for another day.